L&T Session B4: Exploring learning gain

John Robinson Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Teaching, Learning and Students

AbstractReferences | Recording

Professor John Robinson Pro Vice Chancellor for Teaching, Learning and Students facilitated a highly interactive session on exploring the meaning, measurement and implications of learning gain. John used the teaching space creatively to take participants through the history of thinking about learning gain by using the walls to create a giant timeline.

conference2

 

Since 1983, there has been frequent reference to “Learning Gain” in the educational literature and methods for improving student engagement, assessment design, etc. have often been advanced on the basis that they increase Learning Gain. But there is still no widely-agreed definition of Learning Gain. The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) held a conference on learning gain in 2015 whereby Learning Gain was broadly defined as “an attempt to measure the improvement in knowledge, skills, work-readiness and personal development made by students during their time spent in higher education”. Five ways to categorise methodologies for measuring learning gain were proposed: standardised tests, grades, self-reporting surveys, other qualitative methods (such as the York Award) and mixed methods. Following the conference, HEFCE research projects in learning gain were launched whereby the University of York is participating in a programme led by the University of Warwick on using a range of methods, including longitudinal and cross-sectional approaches, to test and develop tools to effectively measure learning gain related to the curriculum and employability.

John then gave participants the opportunity to explore the timeline whilst empowering them to choose which aspects of learning gain (to include engagement, satisfaction and measurement) they would like to explore in groups. Groups then reported back to discuss their findings.

conference1

To conclude, universities claim that their own graduates have the necessary skills to be successful. However, it is imperative to test such claims in an appropriate and fair manner in order to enable universities who can demonstrate significant learning gains in their students to prosper. It is hoped that our unique York Pedagogy with distinctive programme learning outcomes will provide us with a good platform to deliver on demonstrating a significant learning gain for all of our students.

This highly topical and engaging session provided participants with a unique insight into learning gain and helped us all to consider as to how we can demonstrate and maximise learning gain for our students at the support, departmental and institutional levels.

 

Glenn Hurst, Department of Chemistry, University of York

 

L&T Session A4: An academic approach to employability

Cecilia Lowe, Learning Enhancement Team, Academic Support Office; Emily Brunsden, Physics; Calum Neill, Psychology, Edinburgh Napier; and Devi Nannen and Mike Parker, Health Sciences

Abstract | Presentation 1 – Cecilia | Presentation 2 – Emily | Presentation 3 – Calum | Presentation 4 – Mike & Devi | Recording

Cecilia, Mike, Devi and Emily gave a thought provoking presentation on how we might create a critically engaging environment for our students.

Cecilia kiLT Event Talk 26.jpgcked off by reminding us that employability skills are not something different from the business of  higher education and that critical engagement and reflection is both important to employers and central to the business of higher education. She reminded us of the elements of criticality and challenged us to consider the extent to which we are facilitating our students to develop these.

Emily posed the question, what makes lecture attendance unmissable? She facilitates
thinking and critical engagement in lectures with a variety of questioning techniques. Emily uses the students as co-learners and helps them draw on existing knowledge to consider new problems.

LT Event Talk 36.jpg

Finally, Mike and Devi showed us how the use of assertion reason multiple choice questions in assessment can facilitate critical thinking and deeper learning. For them an unexpected benefit of this assessment method was the way students formed groups to deal with what they saw as a challenging form of assessment. Their postgraduate students not only used the example questions provided by the module team but started writing questions themselves. This is a great example of assessment driving learning.

Jill Webb, York Management School, University of York

Deparment of Chemistry to host Teaching Fellows Network Meeting

The Royal Society of Chemistry supports a Teaching Fellows Network. The group encourages colleagues to  discuss common issues, share practice, ask questions and make new contacts. The next meeting will be hosted by the University of York.

Royal Society of Chemistry Teaching Fellows Network Meeting
9th December 2015, 10:30-16:30, Department of Chemistry, University of York

The event is supported by the Royal Society of Chemistry and attendance is free to both members and non-members. Registration is now open, along with inviting programme contributions from all fields of chemistry (and related) teaching. If you would like to attend please register here: https://goo.gl/FFfFW3
Please report to Reception at the Department of Chemistry upon arrival.

Please contact Glenn Hurst (glenn.hurst@york.ac.uk) or David Pugh (david.pugh@york.ac.uk) in the Department of Chemistry for further information.

L&T conference 2015: One size does not fit all: ensuring all students reach their potential

One size does not fit all: ensuring all students reach their potential
The 2015 Learning and Teaching conference was held on 10 June 2015 with 150 delegates from across the university and externally present. This is the University’s annual event to celebrate, showcase and disseminate the wealth of good practice in learning and teaching across the University.This year, the main conference theme was based around addressing inclusivity, diversity and equality within the classroom and curricula. The conference will explore the implications of diversifying delivery of programmes and how students are supported in the process of achieving their potential.

2015 Learning and Teaching conference poster abstracts (Google doc opens in a new window)

Session summaries and materials are now available for the sessions:

Poster session

Keynote:  Christine Hockings – The craft of Artisan Teaching

Workshop A: Giving everyone a voice – all students in small groups want to say something, Victoria Jack, CELT, Education

Workshop B: Making the curriculum more accessible to disabled students, Claire Shanks, James Browne and Penn Snowden, Disability Services

Workshop C: Power to the people: addressing inclusivity and student motivation through choice in assessment format, Cecilia Lowe, Learning Enhancent, ASO, Kathryn Arnold, Department of Environment, Benjamin Poore & Celine Kingman Department of Theatre, Film and Television; Scott Slorach, York Law School

Workshop D: Fitting Language – but how many sizes?, Paul Roberts, Education/CELT

Workshop E: Diversity and mixed ability at modular and programme level. Supporting Ab Initio language students’ transitions, Cinzia Bacilieri, Sam Hellmuth,Thomas Jochum-Critchley, Maria Muradas Casas, Nadine Saupe, Language and Linguistic Science

Workshop F: Effective group work in the multi-cultural classroom: a video presentation, Chris Copland, Education AND Raising awareness of the diversity of Chinese students in British HE communities, Ping Wang, Education

Workshop G: Video recordings of physics lectures, Martin Smalley, Physics, AND Learning before and after the lecture: the role of learning technology, Matt Cornock, E-Learning Development Team, Academic Support Office

Workshop H: Personalising feedback: Can we bridge the formative-summative gap?, Cathy Dantec, Language and Linguistic Science and Bill Soden, Education

Workshop I: ‘Lad culture’ and Higher Education: Exploring implications for inclusivity, equality and the student experience, Vanita Sundaram, Education AND Inclusive Postgraduate Teaching in the Department of Chemistry, Glenn Hurst, Rob Smith, Sue Couling, Chemistry

Workshop J: Taught Student Supervisor Resource, Christine Comrie and Ali Sherratt, Strategic Marketing and Digital Communications and Pete Quinn, Student Support Services

Annual Learning and Teaching Conference: One size does not fit all: ensuring all students reach their potential


Logo_LTConf2015_Rev2The 2015 Learning and Teaching conference was held on 10 June 2015, with almost 150 delegates, from across the university and externally present. This is the University’s annual event to celebrate, showcase and disseminate the wealth of good practice in learning and teaching across the University.

This year, the main conference theme was based around addressing inclusivity, diversity and equality within the classroom and curricula. The conference will explore the implications of diversifying delivery of programmes and how students are supported in the process of achieving their potential.

Session summaries and materials are now available for the sessions.